Present Perfect Tense

  

 Present Perfect Tense

  

1. We use the Present Perfect Tense, like the Simple Past Tense, to talk about completed actions.

However, unlike the Simple Past Tense which is used with definite time phrase, we do not state the exact time of an action with the Present Perfect Tense.

Examples:

Simple past tense

Patrick conducted a workshop for young working adults last week.

(completed action at definite time)

Present perfect tense

Patrick has conducted a workshop for young working adults.

(completed action with no exact time given)

 

2. We use Present perfect tense with words like since & for to refer to an action that began in the past and is still going on at the point of speaking.

Examples:

Simple past tense

I studied at this college for five years.

(I am no longer there)

I was in this college in 1998.

(I am no longer there)

Present perfect tense

I have studied at this college for five years.

(I am still there)

I have been in this college since 1998.

(I joined the college in 1998 and I am still there)

 

3. We use the Present Perfect Tense & not the Simple Past Tense with adverbs of indefinite time such as already & just to show completed actions, and yet to show that an action is expect to happen but has not taken place at the time of speaking.

We use never & ever with Present Perfect Tense to refer to a time frame that began in the indefinite past and continues up to the present. We do not use the words with the Simple Past Tense.

Example:

They have already signed the agreement with our firm.

 (Completed Action.)

Have you ever enjoyed the beauty of nature around you?

(Did you enjoy it in the past? Have you enjoyed it up to now?)

 

4. We use the Present Perfect Tense to refer to a time frame that began in the recent past and is not over yet at point of speaking.

Example:

I haven’t seen Linda this week. She has been so busy.

 (this week not over yet.)

I haven’t had time for breakfast. I have only had a cup of coffee this morning.

(this morning not over yet.)

  

tengkp

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