Present & Past Perfect Continuous Tenses

  

Present & Past Perfect

continuous Tense

  

1. We use the Present Perfect Continuous Tense for an action or situation which began in the past and continues up to the point of speaking. The action may not be finished at this point.

Example:

I have been trying to solve this physics problem for the past couple of hours. (Action is not finished)

We use the Present Perfect Tense to refer to an action which began in the past & continues up to present. Action is finished at this point of speaking.

Example:

I have tried to solve this physics problem but I don’t know how to do it. (action of trying is over)

 

2. We use the Present Perfect Continuous Tense to refer to a series of repeated actions or situations which began in the past & has continued up to the present.

Example:

For the past three weeks, Sylvia and I have been discussing the final arrangements for the graduation dinner.

(certain times in past three weeks, and Action may or may not be finished)

Remember:         Present Perfect Tense

Sylvia and I have already discussed the final arrangements for the graduation dinner.

(Action is finished)

 

3. We use the Present Perfect continuous Tense to refer to action that is temporary in nature & that lasts for a short duration of time.

Example:

I have been practising tennis every evening since the school holidays began.

(temporary action- shorter period of time)

Remember:         Present Perfect Tense

To refer to an action that is more permanent in nature & that lasts for a longer duration of time.

Example:

I have practised tennis twice a week for the past two years. (permanent action- longer period of time)

 

4. We use the Past Perfect continuous Tense to refer to an action which had been going on continuously up to that time in the past that we are talking about.

Example:

Dad had been managing his real estate development company for 25 years before he retired last year.

GrammarBuilder 5

Pages 48 & 49

  

tengkp

 

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