‘yet’ how it is used

Look at the use of “yet” in the following sentences?

1. “When’s your holiday?” “Oh, not for ages yet.”

2. It could be months yet before they know their fate.

3. The election won’t take place for three weeks yet.

4. She won’t be back for a long time yet.

5. Our holiday isn’t for weeks yet.

6. Ron and Charlene will be in Florida for another six days yet.

 

“yet” is often used in negative sentences to talk about something that hasn’t happened so far,

but is expected to happen later.

When a period of time is mentioned,

“yet” indicates “from now until the period of time mentioned has passed” (OALD), and can also be used for this purpose in affirmative (positive) sentences.

 We see this use of “yet” in the second sentence in 1 and in sentences 3, 4 and 5 (all negative sentences),

but also in sentence 6 (an affirmative sentence):

In sentence 1,

“… not for ages yet” the period of time mentioned is “ages” (a long time, but the exact time is unspecified), and this period of time must pass before the speaker goes on his holiday.

In sentence 2,

“It could be months yet before they know their fate.”

 “yet” is used in a slightly different way.

It is used with “could” in an affirmative sentence to say that something (i.e. months before they know their fate) could,

but is unlikely to be true in the future. This means that it is unlikely they will have to wait so long to know their fate.

In sentence 3,

 “The election won’t take place for three weeks yet.”,

the period of time mentioned is “three weeks” and it is only after this period has passed that the election will take place.

In sentence 4,

 “She won’t be back for a long time yet.”,

 the period of time is similar to that in 1, i.e. “a long time”, with no exact figures given. It is only after this period that she will be back.

In sentence 5,

“Our holiday isn’t for weeks yet.”,

the period of time is “weeks”

 (without the number of weeks being mentioned)

and means that we won’t have “our holiday” now,

or this week, but several weeks later.

In sentence 6,

 which is an affirmative sentence,

the period of time mentioned in the sentence is six days, which indicates the number of days left from now that Ron and Charlene will be in Florida,

or the number of days left before they leave Florida.

 

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