Simple Present Tense

 

Simple Present Tense

The Simple Present Tense is used to talk about actions we see as long term or permanent. It is very common and very important.

In these examples, we are talking about regular actions or events.

In these examples, we are talking about facts.

In these examples, we are talking about future facts, usually found in a timetable or a chart.

In these examples, we are talking about our thoughts and feelings at the time of speaking. Notice that, although these feelings can be short-term, we use the present simple and not the present continuous.

tengkp

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2 Comments »

  1. nur nadzirah noh said

    hello ,
    i would like to know why present tense is used to express future actions instead of using future tense itself ?
    could you please explain more about it ?

    • tengkp said

      Yes, it is a very good question.
      we are talking about fact or event that usually happens as planned or repeated action, just like in the Simple Present Tense.
      For example:
      John goes to work at eight every morning except weekends.

      Going to work at 8 in the morning is a routine event for John.

      For this example below,
      •The plane leaves at 5.00 tomorrow morning. (Simple Present Tense)

      The plane is leaving at 5.00 tomorrow (Simple Present Continuous Tense) or
      in your case as you prefer,
      The plane will be leaving tomorrow at 5.00 tomorrow (Future Continuous Tense)
      Noticed that all the above tenses can be used.

      But, we are talking about future facts, usually found in a timetable or a chart.
      So, it is more appropriate to use the Simple Present Tense although it happens in the future or a repeated action that also happens in the future like “He goes to work.”
      Click and look the Future Tense.
      Some sentences use the Present Continuous Tense to show the Future Tense

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